Dating and Relationship Advice – People Judge Your Personality Based On These 7 Small Things

When you first meet someone, you want to assess who they are quickly and determine personality traits. You may be looking out for particular qualities such as kindness, honesty and intelligence because of this.

When you pay attention to these traits, it can help you to decide if you want a relationship of some sort with this person. This kind of character judging will be helpful with major decisions such as hiring someone, entering into a dating relationship, or accepting a job. People judge your personality based upon these things and decide who you might be and might not be.

1. How You Write

Studies have proven that how someone writes and how big their handwriting is will tell you particular things about them. It was revealed by research done by the National Pen Company that people with smaller handwriting are generally meticulous, shy and studious, while people with larger handwriting tend to be more outgoing and looking for attention.

People who put more pressure on the pen/pencil as they write take things more seriously, while people who are more sensitive or empathetic are more light-handed when the write.

2. Colors

The color you tend to wear in clothing most frequently, says Psychology Today, speaks a lot about who you are. People who are artistic, sensitive and have attention to detail choose black a lot, and those who choose red are proactive in their endeavors and live their lives to the fullest.

Affectionate and loyal people really like green, and logical and organized people love white. People who are sensitive, stable and considerate of others really like the color blue.

3. Nail Biting

Particular repetitive behaviors that are body-focused can speak volumes about your personality traits. Depending upon your body’s reaction to situations, such as biting your nails, pulling your hair or picking your skin, these actions could show that you are frustrated, impatient, dissatisfied or bored.

Research has shown that biting your nails, for example, could suggest you may be nervous or tense a lot and that you’re a perfectionist.

4. Shoes

People judgement can be done accurately, according to psychologists, by checking out their shoes. Omri Gilath, lead researcher at the University of Kansas, says that by looking at the style, cost, condition and color of shoes, you can guess around ninety percent of the owner’s characteristics like their political affiliation, income, age and gender.

5. Eyes

The mirror to your soul, eyes can tell much about a person, such as what you are feeling and thinking, and if you are loyal or deceitful. People with blue eyes, according to studies, are not as agreeable and have a greater chance of becoming alcoholics than darker eyed people.

Additionally, the eyes can give you away when you lack steady eye contact, which would show a weak will and lack of self-control.

6. Punctuality

How late or early you show up for meetings or appointments can form either a positive or negative impression about your personality. You are making a negative impression about yourself when you are late for an important date, but when you are early this means you are thoughtful of others’ time and are self-motivated, plus mentally organized. (Totally me)

7. Handshake

People with strong handshakes have been proven to show confidence and have a strong character. These people are more likely to be expressive of their emotions, be extroverted and not as likely to be placid.

People who have a weaker handshake, however, do not have confidence and usually want an easy way out of a challenge. The difference between appearing sincerely friendly or standoffish could simply mean extending a handshake to someone.

 

Was this helpful? I’d love to hear your thoughts on this subject!

 

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Kaja – Out of the Blue – Part 3

Pennsylvania’s DUI law prohibits driving or being in actual physical control of a vehicle while:
•having a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08% or more
•having any amount of a Schedule I or II controlled substance in the body, or
•impaired by drugs or alcohol to an extent that it affects the person’s ability to operate a vehicle safely.

Generally, a driver is deemed to have violated the law if a chemical test conducted within two hours of driving shows a BAC that’s above the legal limit. (Get an estimate of how many drinks it takes to put you at .08%.)

The consequences of a DUI conviction depend on the circumstances, including whether the motorist has prior DUI convictions. This article covers second-offense penalties. (Read more about Pennsylvania’s DUI laws, including first-offense and third-offense consequences.)

(75 Pa. Stat. and Cons. Stat. Ann. § 3802 (2017).)

What Is Considered a “Second-Offense” DUI

In Pennsylvania, a DUI is considered a “second offense” if the motorist has one prior DUI conviction that occurred within the past ten years—including most out-of-state DUI convictions.

(75 Pa. Stat. and Cons. Stat. Ann. § 3806 (2017).)

Penalties for a Second DUI

The consequences of a second DUI conviction—which can be the result of a plea bargain or being found guilty after a trial—differ depending on the facts of the case. But generally, the possible penalties include:
•DUI based on impairment or a BAC of at least .08% but less than .1%. A second DUI conviction where the driver was convicted based on impairment or having a BAC of .08% or more but less than .1% is a misdemeanor. A convicted driver is looking at $300 to $2,500 in fines, five days to six months in jail, and a 12-month license suspension. The motorist will also have to complete an alcohol safety class and may be required to participate in substance abuse treatment.
•Impairment DUIs involving injuries, death, or property damage and DUIs involving BAC of at least .1% but less than .16%. A second DUI conviction where the driver was convicted based on impairment and someone was injured or killed or another’s property was damaged or the driver had a BAC of .1% or more but less than .16% is a misdemeanor. The convicted driver is looking at 30 days to six months in jail, $750 to $5,000 in fines, and a 12-month license suspension. The motorist will also have to complete an alcohol safety class and may be required to participate in substance abuse treatment. (Also, read about Pennsylvania’s homicide-by-vehicle laws.)
•Impairment DUIs involving a refusal to take a breath test and DUIs involving BAC of at least .16% or controlled substances. A second DUI conviction where the driver was convicted based on impairment and refused to take a breath test or the driver had a BAC of at least .16% or any concentration of a controlled substance is a first-degree misdemeanor. The convicted driver is looking at 90 days to five years in jail, at least $1,500 in fines, and an 18-month license suspension. The motorist will also have to complete an alcohol safety class and may be required to participate in substance abuse treatment.
DUIs with a minor passenger. A second offender who’s caught driving under the influence with a passenger who is under 18 years old is guilty of a first-degree misdemeanor. In addition to the penalties mentioned above, the convicted motorist is looking at least $2,500 in fines and one to six months in jail. The driver also faces an 18-month license suspension.

So they basically threw the book at Kaja to teach her a serious lesson.

Starting August 25, 2017, anyone convicted of a second DUI must have an ignition interlock device (IID) installed to obtain a restricted license during the suspension period.

(18 Pa. Stat. and Cons. Stat. Ann. § 1104 (2017); 75 Pa. Stat. and Cons. Stat. Ann. § 3802, 3803, 3804, 3805 (2017); Commonwealth v. Giron, 155 A.3d 635, 638 (2017).)

 

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