Don’t Be A “Covidiot”

Really? Really?

Don’t be a covidiot. That’s what we’re calling these folks who have been highlighted by their stupidity during this pandemic. It is insane to me that in this age of information there are still so many dumb people. It’s terrifying.

Educate yourselves, or you’re endangering yourself and others, and probably end up in one of these posts. Don’t be a covidiot!

1.

Emily Annette@EmilyAnnette6

At the grocery. Wearing my mask. Lady behind me, snarky & loud enough to make sure I heard, “don’t guess she realizes that stupid mask won’t do any good.” Me: “Honey, I’m an off duty nurse, I’m wearing it to protect YOU. But, I can take it off if you’d like.” She practically ran.

2. So, viruses can’t move sideways?

corona, virus, stupid people

3. All The Beans At My Local Grocery Store Are Out Except This One

corona, virus, stupid people

4.

Maria@kalltvatten

Someone’s rooftop party is about to get raided.

View image on Twitter

5. Just Your Typical Walmart Shopper

corona, virus, stupid people

6. Someone Tell Snorkel Lady That It Won’t Work

corona, virus, stupid people

7. If You Can’t Smell It, You Can’t Get It

corona, virus, stupid people

8. 5G —> Death = Science

9. This Guy Was Eating His Food Wearing The Same Gloves He’s Been Wearing Since He Walked In

corona, virus, stupid people

10. So, My Work Had A Meeting About The Importance Of Social Distancing Today

corona, virus, stupid people

11.

Ken Webster jr🇺🇸🌎@KenWebsterII

This woman is the Chair of the Congressional Coronavirus taskforce & this is how she wears her medical mask.

View image on Twitter

12. How To Put Your Mask Correctly

13. Social Gathering At St Kilda Beach Today

corona, virus, stupid people

14. How To Protect Yourself From Coronavirus

corona, virus, stupid people

15. To Shield The Face

corona, virus, stupid people

16.

Alex Fuller@boberfly

“Don’t worry those elevator buttons are fully protected from

View image on Twitter

17. I Don’t Think She Knows What “Quarantining” Means

corona, virus, stupid people

18. She’s Wearing A Mesh Bee Keeper Type Helmet. I’m Not Sure She Gets The Point

19. Ladies And Gentlemen, The President Of Our Meatpacking Plant While Talking About The Plant’s Safety Procedures During The Virus

corona, virus, stupid people

20. To Protect Against COVID-19

corona, virus, stupid people

21. It Was Painful Watching This Happen

22. Someone Brought These Bills To The Bank They Tried To Sanitize In The Oven

23. I Don’t Believe This Is Proper Glove-Wearing Protocol

corona, virus, stupid people

24. Wife Said To Wear A Mask In Public Areas?

25. There Was An Attempt To Use A Mask

corona, virus, stupid people

26. He’s A Little Confused But He Got The Spirit

27. Protesters Against Quarantine Back Again At The Ohio Statehouse

corona, virus, stupid people

28. Seen Today In The Atlanta Airport – Babies In Comforter Bags

corona, virus, stupid people

29. Wrong Type Of Napkin

30. A Group Of Friends Still Getting Together And Partying Regardless Of The Quarantine Rules. Obviously Standing Less Than 6 Feet Apart But It’s Okay Because They’re All Wearing Face Masks

31. You Touch 4 Doors Before The Time Clock. This Is How Management Is Protecting And Caring For Us

corona, virus, stupid people

32. My Local Albertsons Trying To Keep The Buttons Clean… I Don’t Think They Get It

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Tales of Rock – SPECIAL REPORT: Little Richard, Founding Father of Rock Who Broke Musical Barriers, Dead at 87

Pianist-singer behind “Tutti Frutti,” “Good Golly Miss Molly” and “Long Tall Sally” set the template that a generation of musicians would follow

Little Richard, a founding father of rock and roll whose fervent shrieks, flamboyant garb, and joyful, gender-bending persona embodied the spirit and sound of that new art form, died Saturday. He was 87. The musician’s son, Danny Jones Penniman, confirmed the pioneer’s death to Rolling Stone, but said the cause of death was unknown.

Starting with “Tutti Frutti” in 1956, Little Richard cut a series of unstoppable hits – “Long Tall Sally” and “Rip It Up” that same year, “Lucille” in 1957, and “Good Golly Miss Molly” in 1958 – driven by his simple, pumping piano, gospel-influenced vocal exclamations and sexually charged (often gibberish) lyrics. “I heard Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis, and that was it,” Elton John told Rolling Stone in 1973. “I didn’t ever want to be anything else. I’m more of a Little Richard stylist than a Jerry Lee Lewis, I think. Jerry Lee is a very intricate piano player and very skillful, but Little Richard is more of a pounder.”

Although he never hit the top 10 again after 1958, Little Richard’s influence was massive. The Beatles recorded several of his songs, including “Long Tall Sally,” and Paul McCartney’s singing on those tracks – and the Beatles’ own “I’m Down” – paid tribute to Little Richard’s shredded-throat style. His songs became part of the rock and roll canon, covered over the decades by everyone from the Everly Brothers, the Kinks, and Creedence Clearwater Revival to Elvis Costello and the Scorpions.

Little Richard’s stage persona – his pompadours, androgynous makeup and glass-bead shirts – also set the standard for rock and roll showmanship; Prince, to cite one obvious example, owed a sizable debt to the musician. “Prince is the Little Richard of his generation,” Richard told Joan Rivers in 1989 before looking at the camera and addressing Prince. “I was wearing purple before you was wearing it!”

Born Richard Wayne Penniman on December 5th, 1932, in Macon, Georgia, he was one of 12 children and grew up around uncles who were preachers. “I was born in the slums. My daddy sold whiskey, bootleg whiskey,” he told Rolling Stone in 1970. Although he sang in a nearby church, his father Bud wasn’t supportive of his son’s music and accused him of being gay, resulting in Penniman leaving home at 13 and moving in with a white family in Macon. But music stayed with him: One of his boyhood friends was Otis Redding, and Penniman heard R&B, blues and country while working at a concession stand at the Macon City Auditorium.

After performing at the Tick Tock Club in Macon and winning a local talent show, Penniman landed his first record deal, with RCA, in 1951. (He became “Little Richard” when he about 15 years old, when the R&B and blues worlds were filled with acts like Little Esther and Little Milton; he had also grown tired with people mispronouncing his last name as “Penny-man.”) He learned his distinctive piano style from Esquerita, a South Carolina singer and pianist who also wore his hair in a high black pompadour.

For the next five years, Little Richard’s career advanced only fitfully; fairly tame, conventional singles he cut for RCA and other labels didn’t chart. “When I first came along, I never heard any rock & roll,” he told Rolling Stone in 1990. “When I started singing [rock & roll], I sang it a long time before I presented it to the public because I was afraid they wouldn’t like it. I never heard nobody do it, and I was scared.”

By 1956, he was washing dishes at the Greyhound bus station in Macon (a job he had first taken a few years earlier after his father was murdered and Little Richard had to support his family). By then, only one track he’d cut, “Little Richard’s Boogie,” hinted at the musical tornado to come. “I put that little thing in it,” he told Rolling Stone in 1970 of the way he tweaked with his gospel roots. “I always did have that thing, but I didn’t know what to do with the thing I had.”

During this low point, he sent a tape with a rough version of a bawdy novelty song called “Tutti Frutti” to Specialty Records in Chicago. He came up with the song’s famed chorus — “a wop bob alu bob a wop bam boom” — while bored washing dishes. (He also wrote “Long Tall Sally” and “Good Golly Miss Molly” while working that same job.)

By coincidence, label owner and producer Art Rupe was in search of a lead singer for some tracks he wanted to cut in New Orleans, and Penniman’s howling delivery fit the bill. In September 1955, the musician cut a lyrically cleaned-up version of “Tutti Frutti,” which became his first hit, peaking at 17 on the pop chart. “’Tutti Frutti really started the races being together,” he told Rolling Stone in 1990. “From the git-go, my music was accepted by whites.”

Its followup, “Long Tall Sally,” hit Number Six, becoming his the highest-placing hit of his career. For just over a year, the musician released one relentless and arresting smash after another. From “Long Tall Sally” to “Slippin’ and Slidin,’” Little Richard’s hits – a glorious mix of boogie, gospel, and jump blues, produced by Robert “Bumps” Blackwell — sounded like he never stood still. With his trademark pompadour and makeup (which he once said he started wearing so that he would be less “threatening” while playing white clubs), he was instantly on the level of Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis and other early rock icons, complete with rabid fans and mobbed concerts. “That’s what the kids in America were excited about,” he told Rolling Stone in 1970. “They don’t want the falsehood — they want the truth.”

As with Presley, Lewis and other contemporaries, Penniman also was cast in early rock and roll movies like Don’t Knock the Rock (1956) and The Girl Can’t Help It (1957). In a sign of how segregated the music business and radio were at the time, though, Pat Boone’s milquetoast covers of “Tutti Frutti” and “Long Tall Sally,” both also released in 1956, charted as well if not higher than Richard’s own versions. (“Boone’s “Tutti Frutti” hit Number 12, surpassing Little Richard’s by nine slots.) Penniman later told Rolling Stone that he made sure to sing “Long Tall Sally” faster than “Tutti Frutti” so that Boone couldn’t copy him as much.

But then the hits stopped, by his own choice. After what he interpreted as signs – a plane engine that seemed to be on fire and a dream about the end of the world and his own damnation – Penniman gave up music in 1957 and began attending the Alabama Bible school Oakwood College, where he was eventually ordained a minister. When he finally cut another album, in 1959, the result was a gospel set called God Is Real.

His gospel music career floundering, Little Richard returned to secular rock in 1964. Although none of the albums and singles he cut over the next decade for a variety of labels sold well, he was welcomed back by a new generation of rockers like the Rolling Stones and Bob Dylan (who used to play Little Richard songs on the piano when he was a kid). When Little Richard played the Star-Club in Hamburg in 1964, the opening act was none other than the Beatles. “We used to stand backstage at Hamburg’s Star-Club and watch Little Richard play,” John Lennon said later. “He used to read from the Bible backstage and just to hear him talk we’d sit around and listen. I still love him and he’s one of the greatest.”

By the 1970s, Little Richard was making a respectable living on the rock oldies circuit, immortalized in a searing, sweaty performance in the 1973 documentary Let the Good Times Roll. During this time, he also became addicted to marijuana and cocaine while, at the same time, returning to his gospel roots.

Little Richard also dismantled sexual stereotypes in rock & roll, even if he confused many of his fans along the way. During his teen years and into his early rock stardom, his stereotypical flamboyant personality made some speculate about his sexuality, even if he never publicly came out. But that flamboyance didn’t derail his career. In the 1984 biography The Life and Times of Little Richard (written with his cooperation), he denounced homosexuality as “contagious … It’s not something you’re born with.” (Eleven years later, he said in an interview with Penthouse that he had been “gay all my life.”)

Later in life, he described himself as “omnisexual,” attracted to both men and women. But during an interview with the Christian-tied Three Angels Broadcasting Group in 2017, he suddenly denounced gay and trans lifestyles: “God, Jesus, He made men, men, he made women, women, you know? And you’ve got to live the way God wants you to live. So much unnatural affection. So much of people just doing everything and don’t think about God.”

Yet none of that seemed to damage his mystique or legend. In the 1980s, he appeared in movies like Down and Out in Beverly Hills and in TV shows like Full House and Miami Vice. In 1986, he was one of the 10 original inductees into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and in 1993, he was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Grammys. His last known recording was in 2010, when he cut a song for a tribute album to gospel singer Dottie Rambo.

In the years before his death, Little Richard, who was by then based in Nashville, still performed periodically. Onstage, though, the physicality of old was gone: Thanks to hip replacement surgery in 2009, he could only perform sitting down at his piano. But his rock and roll spirit never left him. “I’m sorry I can’t do it like it’s supposed to be done,” he told one audience in 2012. After the audience screamed back in encouragement, he said – with a very Little Richard squeal — “Oh, you gonna make me scream like a white girl!”

God Bless Little Richard! Rest in Peace.

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Great… Now We Have Murder Hornets

Kobe Bryant dies in a helicopter crash.

Covid 19 paralyzes the planet.

UFO videos released by the government.

And now… Murder Hornets!

 

Just when you thought 2020 could not get any worse. Now we have giant hornets with freakish eyes and a venomous sting to add to this year’s long list of worries.

 

For the first time, Asian giant hornets have been spotted in the United States, specifically in Washington state, scientists say. Beekeepers have reported piles of dead bees with their heads ripped off, an alarming sight in a country with a rapidly declining bee population.
At more than two inches long, they’re the world’s largest hornets with a sting that can kill humans if stung multiple times, according to experts at the Washington State University. The giant insects are nicknamed “murder hornets.”
“They’re like something out of a monster cartoon with this huge yellow-orange face,” Susan Cobey, a bee breeder at the Washington State University’s department of entomology, said recently.

A size comparison of the Asian giant hornet and several other insects

How did they come to the US?

Scientists don’t know how these giant hornets native to Asia ended up in Washington state.
They can sometimes be transported in international cargo, according to Seth Truscott with WSU’s college of agricultural, human and natural resource sciences.
The giant hornet was first spotted in the state in December, and scientists believe it started becoming active again last month, when queens emerge from hibernation to build nests and form colonies.
“Hornets are most destructive in the late summer and early fall, when they are on the hunt for sources of protein to raise next year’s queens,” Truscott said on the WSU’s Insider.
“They attack honey bee hives, killing adult bees and devouring bee larvae and pupae, while aggressively defending the occupied colony,” he added. “Their stings are big and painful, with a potent neurotoxin. Multiple stings can kill humans, even if they are not allergic.”

What should you do if you spot one?

Washington state agricultural officials are asking beekeepers and residents to report any sightings of the giant hornets. But don’t get too close. Its sting can penetrate a regular beekeeper’s suit, and state scientists had to order special reinforced suits.
“Don’t try to take them out yourself if you see them,” said entomologist Chris Looney of the state Department of Agriculture. “If you get into them, run away, then call us! It is really important for us to know of every sighting, if we’re going to have any hope of eradication.”
State officials are asking people in Whatcom, Skagit, Island, San Juan, Jefferson and Clallam counties to be especially vigilant.

When are they most destructive?

The giant hornets especially target bees between late summer and the fall.
“The most likely time to catch Asian giant hornets is from July through October — when colonies are established and workers are out foraging,” the Washington State Department of Agriculture said in a statement. “Traps can be hung as early as April if attempting to trap queens, but since there are significantly fewer queens than workers, catching a queen isn’t very likely.”
State officials set up traps and launched an app to quickly report sightings, saying just a few of the hornets can devastate a hive within hours.
Bees pollinate plants producing fruit, nuts and vegetables, and are crucial to the nation’s food industry. Attack by the hornets risks decimating bees, which are already on endangered lists due to their sharply declining numbers.

Murder Hornets,' with sting that can kill, land in US - ABC News

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COVID-19 Update: 9 People Infected Because of Air-Conditioning; Don’t Use AC, Experts Say

According to MSN Lifestyle’s latest report, air-conditioning may increase the risk of further infection caused by the novel coronavirus.

In the United States, 5.4 million air-conditioning units were manufactured in 2019 to prepare for this year’s summer season. However, experts say it isn’t the best time to use ACs as two studies discovered that COVID-19 particles can spread by ventilation, heating, and air-conditioning.

(Photo : CDC on Unsplash)

9 People Infected By COVID-19; Air-Conditioning Is The Main Cause Experts Say; Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Use AC!

According to the report, most individuals spend 90% of their lives in built environments like cars, public transportation, and buildings, breathing in shared indoor air and touching potentially contaminated surfaces.

“Air conditioners will take air and re-circulate it through the room, and it’s through that mechanism that these coronavirus droplets can be transmitted,” said Qingyan Chen, a mechanical engineering professor at Purdue University.

Chen brought up that the 700 individuals out of 3,000 passengers on the Diamon Princess Cruise Shop got infected. “After quarantine, many people still got sick on the ship and I suspect that the air conditioning system could play a role there,” he said.

However, other experts are skeptical about the report. Meghan May, an epidemiologist and professor at the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine, said that prioritizing physical distance is more important than worrying about air-conditioning.

“I’m not yet convinced it is a concern. But if it is, I would say air-conditioning is the least of your worries in mass transit or apartments,” she said in the report of Business Insider.

Nine people infected by COVID-19; Air-conditioning is the main cause, experts say

According to MSN Lifestyle, a study discovered that nine people in a restaurant were infected because of air-conditioning which blew the coronavirus droplets.

The study was published in the Journal Emerging Infectious Diseases on April 2, focusing on the infected causes in a restaurant located in China which raised concerns about AC’s risk factors.

(Photo : Ashkan Forouza on Unsplash)

Nine infections in Guanzhou were linked by the researchers to one 63-year-old woman. Most of the infected individuals didn’t have direct contact with the woman, but they sat on the tables near her. The study concluded that the air-conditioning of the restaurant blew the particles around infecting the other individuals.

The report stated that the finding is alarming since it implies that air-conditioning can increase the risk of getting the virus without having direct contact with an infected individual.

However, it was also stated that the droplets which came from the infected woman didn’t spread too far from her position; only 10 individuals out of 83 customers of the restaurant were infected.

The study serves as a warning to those restaurants and other establishments with wide air-conditioning units that are looking to open up for the summer to take precautionary measures to avoid further spreading the virus.

 

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More deaths in Pennsylvania, and New Jersey’s reopening plans move tentatively forward

The pandemic proved as relentless as the rain on Sunday, as the death count from the coronavirus continued to rise in Pennsylvania and New Jersey and larger plans for a safe reopening remained in flux.

An additional 4,800 cases were diagnosed in both states, and nearly a thousand people were being treated in Philadelphia hospitals.

Nationally, the one certainty remained uncertainty.

Americans should expect social-distancing measures to continue through the summer, White House Coronavirus Taskforce Coordinator Deborah Birx said, adding that the nation needs a “breakthrough” in testing to gauge the virus’ spread accurately. Top infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci said the United States must at least double its testing capacity before restarting the economy, up from the current 1.5 million to 2 million tests that are being conducted a week.

Governors in states where the numbers of new infections have been slowing are grappling with when to reopen, while health experts cautioned that the ability to test, trace, and isolate positive patients is crucial to managing the inevitable spike of infections that will follow.

“We’re going to move as one state,” Murphy said, “recognizing you’ve got density issues in the north that you just don’t have in the south.”

New Jersey needs additional money from federal lawmakers to recover, Murphy said, warning that while “we won’t go bankrupt” without it, the state will have to “gut the living daylights” out of essential jobs such as teachers and first responders.

An additional 3,730 New Jerseyans tested positive, officials announced Sunday, bring the total to 109,038. And 75 more deaths were reported, raising the toll to 5,938.

In New York state, officials announced 367 new deaths on Sunday, the lowest tally in almost a month, and Gov. Andrew Cuomo spoke of a phased reopening that could start as soon as May 15.

The pandemic continued to produce odd, societal side effects:

This has already been the deadliest year for tornadoes since 2011, a major news story subsumed by the coronavirus. Gas prices have tumbled a dollar a gallon in Pennsylvania and 89 cents in New Jersey from a year ago, according to AAA, the result of people obeying government stay-at-home orders.

Pennsylvania and New Jersey casinos have lost millions in gaming revenues.

The Philadelphia Zoo, though closed by the pandemic, still picked a name for newly born sloth bear, “Keematee,” the Hindu word for “Precious,” selected by an on-line poll.

The Blue Angels and Thunderbirds flight teams plan to conduct a Tuesday flyover of New York City, Newark, Trenton, and Philadelphia to honor front-line COVID-19 workers, the Air Force and Navy announced, with the schedule to be released on Monday. People should stay home to watch, the military branches emphasized.

In Philadelphia, officials announced 237 new cases on Sunday, bringing the total to 12,566. Six more deaths were added, raising the city toll to 472. About half of those fatalities were in long-term care facilities.

Across Pennsylvania 1,116 more people tested positive for a total caseload of 41,165, and 1,550 people have died, state officials said. Deaths in nursing and personal-care homes account for 61% of the total, according to government data.

“As we see the number of new COVID-19 cases continuously change across the state, that does not mean we can stop practicing social distancing,” Secretary of Health Rachel Levine said. “We must continue to stay home to protect ourselves, our families and our community.”

 

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13 Everyday Habits That Could (and Should) Change Forever After Coronavirus

It’ll be a whole new world.

Cultural changes ahead

In a few short weeks, we’ve seen adaptations to living in a world with COVID-19, a novel strain of the coronavirus that has become a global pandemic. Between skipping handshakes, keeping a safe distance from other people, and being (much) more diligent about proper handwashing, we’re in the process of seeing what kind of impact the spread of the virus will have on our cultural, social, and hygiene practices.

According to CJ Xia, a VP of marketing and sales at Boster Biological Technology, a biotech company based in Pleasanton, California, there were three types of people before the coronavirus outbreak: those who were extremely conscious, moderately conscious, and ignorant about germs. “Now the level of each category has risen, and it is difficult to find the third type of folks now,” Xia tells Reader’s Digest. “As a result, we have started seeing far less social interaction. [And] remember, when one thing is done again and again, then it becomes a part of muscle memory.”

Though it’s difficult to find a bright side to the coronavirus outbreak, one positive is that this period of global upheaval may change some of our less-than-desirable public-health habits—and improve our hygiene for good. It could also alter the way we approach work, school, and so much more. Here are 13 everyday habits that could (and should) change forever once this crisis has passed.

Business people greeting during COVID-19 pandemicMARTIN-DM/GETTY IMAGES

Handshakes will be out

One of the most visible changes to societal norms since the coronavirus has hit has been avoiding handshakes. “In this new era of the coronavirus and the practice of social distancing, there will undoubtedly be a cultural shift in the way we all greet one another,” Nesochi Okeke-Igbokwe, MD, an internist and health expert, tells Reader’s Digest. “Shaking hands, high fives, hugs, and kisses are modes of greeting to be abandoned at this point. Social greetings may now entail a hand on the heart, a head nod, or pretty much any action that enables one to avoid direct touch or contact.” Here are more polite ways to get out of shaking hands.

Automatic alcohol dispenser in the hospitalZEPHYR18/GETTY IMAGES

There will be more hand sanitizer available in public places

In the days post–coronavirus outbreak, we’re probably going to see more hand sanitizer made available in offices, public spaces, and entertainment events. “For example, sanitizers would be placed at reception or outside interview rooms to make sure candidates’ hands are clean,” Xia says. “We would see sanitizers at the table of interviewers as well. It would no longer be rare. By placing such products around, everyone would be signaling to other people that their hands are clean.” And though many concert venues, stores, and gyms already provide hand-sanitizer dispensers, we’re likely to see this expand to including more restaurants, churches, and other establishments. That said, you can have too much of a good thing: Check out these 13 times you’re overusing hand sanitizer.

Confident female professional discussing with colleaguesALVAREZ/GETTY IMAGES

We’ll get better at responding to customer and client needs

The coronavirus outbreak has forced people to form rapid-response teams that cut across functions and seniority, according to Joanne Cleaver, author of The Career Lattice and a consultant and trainer to employers and individuals on how to use lateral career strategies for sustained growth. “People will discover that their coworkers and employees have talents that are relevant—even vital—to keeping the company operating,” she tells Reader’s Digest. “It’s up to employees to make the case, post-virus, that their employers should invest in additional training and skills development to develop the abilities that came to the fore in the crisis. And it’s on companies to extract strategic value from how people rose to the occasion.”

Minimal bread cafe decorating with white wall and wooden chairs. Warm, cozy and comfortable.ARTIT_WONGPRADU/GETTY IMAGES

Our relationships with restaurants may change

Dining out—or even getting takeout or delivery—is pretty different now compared to what it was like even a few weeks ago. According to Johann Moonesinghe, an expert in restaurant finance and the founder of inKind, a restaurant financing platform, we are already seeing a dramatic shift in how consumers are eating at restaurants. “The restaurants that require their guests to dine in are seeing the largest decline in sales, whereas bakeries that don’t have a lot of dining tables are busier than ever,” he tells Reader’s Digest. “And it is not just where people are going, it’s also what they are eating. We also have seen an increase in the sale of carbs and sugary products.”

Though it’s unclear exactly how our relationship with restaurants will play out after the outbreak, there will likely be changes. For example, delivery and takeout options might be expanded (in case something like this happens again), and more explicit information might be posted in the restaurant about its hygiene practices.

toilet with electronic seat automatic flush, japan style toilet bowl, high technology sanitary ware.RATCHAT/GETTY IMAGES

More people will use bidets

Though bidets that attach to your home toilet have become increasingly popular over the past few years, the sales and searches of these products have surged since the onset of the coronavirus outbreak. In fact, last week, TUSHY—a company that makes attachable bidets—had sales that were 10 times what they were before word spread of TP shortages. And that’s on top of TUSHY already selling well over double what they’d been selling a year ago, according to a rep from the company.

If we’ve learned one thing already from this outbreak, it’s that people are extremely concerned about having enough toilet paper. Given that bidets are an alternative to (or an addition to) toilet paper, it makes sense that more people are interested in them now. Now that bidets are becoming more popular and commonplace in American bathrooms, we’ll likely continue to see that trend after the pandemic is over.

Senior woman at homeEVA-KATALIN/GETTY IMAGES

More companies will permit employees to work remotely

These days, it’s pretty standard to negotiate some sort of arrangement for working remotely at least part of the time when you start a new job, but after the coronavirus outbreak, even more companies will permit employees to do so. “Once businesses and their employees see that working from home is not only doable but that it might even be more productive, it could cause a big shift in office cultures across the globe,” says Angela Ash, the content marketing manager at UpFlip, a site that assists people through business investments. “With so many companies allowing their team members to work remotely, and even intentionally hiring a remote workforce in the first place, this could be much more than a solution to the virus.” Here are the reasons that telecommuting may be the most important job perk to ask for, after health insurance.

 

Neon elevator controlsHATMAN12/GETTY IMAGES

We’ll find another way to press buttons

Even before coronavirus became an issue, most of us were aware of everyday locations that are laden with germs. These places include buttons on ATMs, the credit-card swiper at the grocery store (and the attached pen), and buttons in an elevator. According to Dr. Okeke-Igbokwe, people might start pushing those elevator buttons with their elbow or even an object like a pen instead of their fingers. “The same goes for pushing your pin number at the ATM or making a purchase at a store,” she adds. “Directly touching the keypads with your fingers will be an action of the past.”

Nikola Djordjevic, MD, cofounder of HealthCareers, agrees that pushing buttons in public is something that could change. “Surfaces are ideal places for transmitting the disease, and a lot of people now have to get rid of the habit of pressing elevator buttons or touching handles with their hands,” she explains. “Ideally, people should cover their skin with clothes or simply press buttons with elbows. In case they accidentally use their fingers, people should avoid touching their face until they get a chance to wash hands with soap.” And this isn’t just a good idea in terms of coronavirus. Check out this long list of diseases you can prevent just by washing your hands.

Bowl of halved cashew nuts in a wooden bowlETIENNEVOSS/GETTY IMAGES

It may be the end of communal foods

Free food is great, but let’s be honest: Those bowls of popcorn and nuts at bars have always been kind of suspect. After all, just how many people use the restroom, don’t wash their hands, and then help themselves to a scoop of snacks via their very dirty hands? But the coronavirus outbreak will cause more people to rethink eating out of communal food containers. “You may also likely notice avoidance of buffets and salad bars to avoid picking up germs from serving spoons,” Dr. Okeke-Igbokwe explains. “There [also] will be a greater focus on purchasing ingredients to prepare your own meals as hygienically as possible at home.” Here are another 12 things you’re probably sharing that germ experts wouldn’t.

Crossing the street in San Francisco's Mission DistrictGEORGECLERK/GETTY IMAGES

People will take their personal space more seriously

One of the most visible policies in the age of the coronavirus is the idea of “social distancing.” According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, this involves staying at least six feet away from other people. And while we probably won’t see that six-foot rule remain in effect after the outbreak is over, a version of it will likely continue, says Dmytro Okunyev, the founder of Chanty, a team chat platform using artificial intelligence. “People will start paying more attention to whom they let approach them in their personal space and the socially acceptable personal distance will change in most cultures.

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SOCIAL DISTANCING IS RESETTING ONE BEHAVIOR MANY OF US HAVE GOTTEN VERY WRONG

The COVID-19 pandemic is disrupting daily routines around the world. Overwhelmed hospitals, desolate schools, ghostly towns and self-isolation echo a campy horror flick, but an all too real one.

Companies are laying people off by the thousands, the service industry is teetering on the brink of collapse, and socialist ideas suddenly don’t sound so bad to an average citizen. According to a recent poll by the University of Southern California, around 40% of individuals feel anxiety about the pandemic, and more than half have been avoiding some or all other people.

As a psychologist who aims to understand the role of sleep in what makes us tick, I focus mostly on how the sleep-wake cycle impacts our day-to-day social lives. This makes me think of one thing we can do, especially for those of us at home. That is to SLEEP.

This reversible state of disengagement with the world is one of the most important protective and restorative factors in human life. Slumber is essential for thinking clearly and staying upbeat during any time. Moreover, sleep is indispensable for maintaining the immunological function, which is key to preventing and recovering from infectious diseases like COVID-19. Losing sleep makes people more susceptible to viral infections, and it undermines recovery from the common cold as well as more serious conditions. For this lethally stealthy bug, it may be even more important.

Unfortunately, it is exactly during times of social uncertainty and anxiety, when we need to sleep the most, that it is most disrupted. Anxiety over the future and fear for the health of loved ones threaten calm nights and impinge on sleep by increasing hyper-arousal and rumination – reactions known to intensify insomnia. Isolation from regular social rhythms and natural light will further mess with our body clock, confusing us about when we are supposed to feel tired and when to perk up.

Most Americans are not meeting this crisis well-rested. Research we have conducted over the past few years using CDC data on hundreds of thousands of Americans suggests that the smartphone age has led to a substantial deterioration in both duration and quality of sleep. A case in point, a recent analysis that my team conducted suggests that over the past five years, millions more Americans report sleeping problems.

And the psychological toll is not too far away, but it will register most forcefully after the infection rates start to decline. Once the pandemic peaks and the physical damage to bodies start to wane, only then will the full consequences of this pandemic on our well-being be apparent. Inevitable increases in psychological complaints, suicide, and substance use disorders need to be anticipated and mitigated now. Recall that after the “Great Recession” of 2008-09 there were millions of more people with health and psychological problems in both the U.S. and Europe.

So how to go about protecting our sleep? Besides the threats and challenges, this time actually provides hidden opportunities as well. When is the last time that the majority of any population stayed at home for days, often without the need to use alarm clocks?!

Besides connecting with those closest to us, many of us can sleep in and organize lives in ways that suit our biological ticker. Larks can go to bed earlier and owls can snooze in. Families can synchronize their meal and play routines in new ways, honoring the time of their internal clock (what chrono-biologists call the ‘circadian’ phase’). For most of our history, we slept with one another when our bodies told us too, not by ourselves and only when work allowed. This may be an unprecedented opportunity to embrace a basic human need to switch off on a regular basis, helping human bodies fight the wars only those bodies know-how.

 

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Sadly There’s No Vaccine For People Being Stupid During The Coronavirus Outbreak

Disasters like the coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic have a tendency to bring out the best and the worst in humanity, as people’s normal lives are altered and they face a host of new stressors from quarantines and social-distancing to previously unknown levels of uncertainty and fear.

It’s only been a little over a week now that things began getting truly strange in the United States and some people are dealing with it better than others. But this post isn’t about the people who are dealing with it well. This post is about the people who are losing their minds, losing their sh*t, and doing things like spreading conspiracy theories and straight-up licking toilet seats.

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Experts Worry ‘Quarantine Fatigue’ Is Starting

Researchers tracking smartphone data say they recently made a disturbing discovery: For the first time since states began implementing stay-at-home orders in mid-March to limit the spread of the novel coronavirus, Americans are staying home less.

The nationwide shift during the week of April 13 was relatively slight. However, any loss of momentum, particularly when stay-in-place orders remain in effect across most of the country, has some public health experts worried about “quarantine fatigue.” Any increase in travel, they say, is premature when staying home remains the most effective way to limit the spread of the virus until widespread testing and contact tracing become available.

“We saw something we hoped wasn’t happening, but it’s there,” said Lei Zhang, lead researcher and director of the Maryland Transportation Institute at the University of Maryland. “It seems collectively we’re getting a little tired. It looks like people are loosening up on their own to travel more.”

Zhang said he anticipates the number of people staying home will continue to drop as some states begin allowing businesses, beaches and other public facilities to reopen. That process began last week in South Carolina and Georgia.

Public health experts say any data showing widespread public resolve or cooperation beginning to wane is noteworthy. Because this is the first U.S. pandemic in 100 years, they don’t know how long people are willing to tolerate cabin fever for the greater good.

They say they’re not surprised, however, that a slide occurred in a week that saw the first highly publicized challenges to such orders by protesters and President Donald Trump, who tweeted his support to “liberate” states from shutdowns. The White House also released federal guidelines that week for states seeking to reopen their economies. And a growing number of governors, including in Texas, Minnesota and Vermont, set dates for when they planned to gradually lift restrictions.

By April 17, the researchers found, the share of people presumed to have stayed home – meaning their phones didn’t move at least a mile that day – declined from a national average of 33 percent to 31 percent, compared with the previous Friday. That came after six weeks of the staying-home percentage increasing or holding steady.

The number of work trips remained about the same. However, the average number of personal daily trips grew to 2.5 per person, up from 2.4 the previous Friday – a 4 percent increase. Trips between counties and states also increased.

Because the study’s sample size is so large – more than 100 million cellphones observed monthly – even slight changes are statistically significant, Zhang said.

Dr. Wilbur Chen, an associate professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, said it’s too soon to know whether the findings reveal a one-week blip or the start of a trend. Chen, a member of Republican Gov. Larry Hogan’s covid-19 task force in Maryland, said he’s keeping a close eye on the data, but researchers won’t know for several weeks if more travel led to more coronavirus hospitalizations or deaths – the two most reliable measures of the virus’ spread.

“But it all makes sense,” Chen said. “If people are out and about, there’s more risk of transmission, and when there’s transmission, you have more cases of hospitalizations and deaths.”

George Rutherford, an epidemiology professor at the University of California at San Francisco, said he’s concerned to hear that more people are venturing out while infections remain on the rise in much of the country.

“We’re going to have to do this carefully,” Rutherford said of states beginning to ease restrictions. “Letting people decide for themselves because they’re bored is not a good way to do it. . . . This is not the time to be letting up.”

Experts have theories about why the week of April 13, the most recent data available, became a tipping point. Many homebound Americans hit the mental milestone of the fifth week, technically entering a second month, with no clear end in sight. Even with the boom in video calls and virtual cocktail hours, they say, feelings of loneliness and isolation continue to mount. Balmy spring temperatures also probably drew people out, particularly in warmer regions where a hot, sticky summer will soon descend.

It’s also no coincidence, they say, that resolve would begin to wane amid the Trump-supported protests, even as most Americans tell pollsters they support stay-at-home requirements.

Lorien Abroms, a public health professor at George Washington University, said it doesn’t help that the public has received “mixed messages,” including Trump’s “tacit support” of the protesters.

“I think the message is getting out that you can give in to your fatigue and say ‘It’s enough,’ ” Abroms said.

Some people also might have mistakenly believed they could safely start bending the stay-at-home rules, experts say, when some governors began to publicly announce how and when their economies would begin to reopen.

“People can feel it’s coming, so they get more antsy,” said Susan Hassig, an associate professor of epidemiology at Tulane University. “It’s kind of like a kid before Christmas.”

Governors in Georgia, South Carolina and Tennessee announced reopening dates Monday, after the latest cellphone data was analyzed. However, the percentages of people staying home in those states as of April 17 already were among the lowest in the country, between 23 percent and 26 percent.

Travis Gayles, the chief health officer in Montgomery County, Maryland, called the potential problem of residents losing patience “an important point that I think every jurisdiction across the country is grappling with in terms of making sure we reinforce our message related to shelter-in-place.”

Gayles said he wasn’t familiar with the data, but questioned whether Montgomery residents might have ventured out more after the county began requiring shoppers to wear face coverings in stores, pharmacies and other retailers.

Even so, Gayles said, “The message is very clear. We’re still encouraging folks to stay home and only come out when they need to,” such as to go to work or the grocery store.

The reversal first became apparent last week, when the Maryland researchers continued to analyze the movements of smartphones via location data from apps. The aggregated and anonymous data, while imperfect, is an easily obtainable and consistent way to measure how much people move about, Zhang said. He said researchers are sharing the mobility data with government officials and epidemiologists modeling the spread of covid-19.

The nationwide drop in the researchers’ “social distancing index” started April 14. That was one day before thousands of protesters in Michigan received national attention for jamming roads around the state capitol, demanding that the restrictions be eased and people be allowed to return to work.

The social distancing index reflects how much people stay home, as well as how much and how far they travel by plane, car, transit, bicycle and on foot, Zhang said. Phones that didn’t make any stops of 10 minutes or more, such as those on people out for a bike ride or walk with the dog, were counted as staying home, Zhang said.

In the Washington region, the District of Columbia and its suburbs all saw an increase in travel and a 1 percent to 5 percent drop in people staying home by April 17. The biggest drop occurred in Arlington County, Virginia, where 50 percent of residents stayed home, down from 55 percent the previous Friday. However, Arlington tied with the District for the highest percentage in the region.

In Montgomery County, Maryland, the number of those staying home fell from 45 percent to 43 percent, while Prince George’s County fell from 37 percent to 34 percent. In Northern Virginia, Fairfax County dropped from 46 percent to 44 percent, while Prince William County ended the week with 34 percent and Loudoun County with 37 percent.

Of course, the data has its limits. Zhang said researchers are still trying to determine where people are going. If someone takes a round-trip drive to walk alone in the woods, for example, they would be counted as making two trips, even though they weren’t any more likely to spread or catch the virus.

Hassig, of Tulane, said the data is interesting because the United States has such limited experience requiring residents to stay home for lengthy periods. Any quarantines typically are small enough that local health officers can check in daily to monitor people’s symptoms and encourage them to stay isolated. Moreover, she said, most last a maximum 14 to 21 days. “We can usually reduce the likelihood of substantial quarantine fatigue,” Hassig said. “. . . On this massive scale, the support and encouragement can get lost.”

The coronavirus stay-at-home orders are far less restrictive than quarantines, but public health experts say convincing people to stay in will become harder as the weeks pass. The more effectively such orders lower rates of infection, they say, the more some people will incorrectly assume they’re no longer necessary.

Most importantly, experts say, governments wanting to discourage people from venturing out need to better understand why they’re doing so. The response to restlessness, for example, might be to reopen larger parks or close more streets to traffic to allow people to get outdoors at safe distances. If some people are starting to drive for Uber or Lyft because they lost their retail job, the response might be more financial aid. For those feeling cut off, experts say, government messages of sympathy and compassion would help.

“The isolation is real. The loneliness is real,” said Abroms, of GWU. “We need to add that in our messaging. . . . We have to acknowledge that it’s not easy to stay home.”

 

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Philly Coronavirus News: Thousands Violate Stay-at-Home Order to Watch Dirt-Stupid Fighter Jet Flyover

Plus, Phillies season could open in June at Citizens Bank Park and takeout cocktails may be coming soon.

You want to know how to basically guarantee that lots and lots of people will violate the coronavirus stay-at-home order? It’s really very simple. You just organize a flyover featuring some of the most impressive fighter jets in the world.

On Tuesday afternoon, thousands of Philadelphians took to the streets, parks and local landmarks in clear violation of the stay-at-home order to see the Blue Angels-Thunderbirds joint flyover of the city. From Penn Treaty Park along the Delaware River to the Art Museum steps to the Chili’s parking lot on City Avenue in Bala Cynwyd, crowds gathered to witness the spectacle.

The flyover (seen in this video as the jets flew by the Philly skyline; video courtesy Brittany Tsoflias) was a lovely gesture, intended to pay tribute to the first-responders and medical workers who are sacrificing so much to get us through the coronavirus crisis. But when you want people to stay at home — and officials did tell people to stay at home for the flyover — maybe having a once-in-a-lifetime type of event that is best witnessed from wide open areas (as opposed to your little front stoop) is not the way to go.

Just a thought.

(P.S.: I’ve seen more than a few such flyovers, and this one wasn’t even very good.)

Phillies Season Could Open In June at Citizens Bank Park

The Phillies were supposed to play their home opener on April 2nd at Citizens Bank Park. Obviously, that didn’t happen.

But according to various reports, the Phillies might still get to play at Citizens Bank Park this year. Major League Baseball is reportedly considering a plan that would allow teams to play in empty stadiums. The kickoff for this, if it all comes together, would be sometime between mid-June and the 4th of July.

No word on who the Phillies Phanatic will run around and try to annoy if the stadium is empty.

Takeout Cocktails May Be Coming Soon Amid Coronavirus Shutdown

It is illegal for bars and restaurants to sell takeout booze. But it looks like that is about to change, thanks to a bill that is making its way through Harrisburg and expected to pass into law any day.

Bars that already had the required permit to sell takeout beer and wine have been allowed to do so since the shutdown began. But this would let them sell you a gin and tonic, Long Island iced tea, daiquiri — whatever!

Alas, you probably won’t be able to walk down Walnut Street with a martini in your hand this time next year. The bill specifically says that this would only be temporary. So keep that flask handy.

Pennsylvania Golf Courses Can Reopen This Friday

Apparently, golf courses have been closed all this time. I didn’t realize this, because I drive by a Philly golf course almost every day, and every time I do, there are golfers there doing their golfing thing in their silly golfing clothes.

Huh.

Anyway, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf has announced that he’s allowing golf courses to legally open starting this Friday, part of his plan to slowly reopen the state. He’s also allowing marinas, privately owned campgrounds, and guided fishing trips to resume business on Friday.

Enjoy!

 

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